Frequently Asked Questions

1

Q: I haven’t told anyone about receiving counseling. What happens if I run into my therapist out in the community?

Because we live in a small community, you could unexpectedly meet your therapist at the grocery, church, etc. Remember, your therapist is required by law to respect your confidentiality. He/she will not acknowledge knowing you unless you greet him/her first. Even then, no mention of counseling will occur; what happens in our office stays in our office. We’re committed to protecting your privacy at all times.
2

Q: Do I have to be a Christian to get counseling at Turning Point?

Nope. Turning Point is an agency for people of all racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual orientations. We do not discriminate. We respect the values of all individuals, and we work closely with your values. If we cannot help you ethically (meaning we are not experts in a certain area, or we are out of our scope of practice) we will refer you to someone who is a better fit for your needs. Multicultural, religious, and identity issues are common topics discussed in our sessions as we work toward forming a relationship and goals for counseling.
3

Q: Does Turning Point do “Christian Counseling”? What kind of counseling will I receive?

Turning Point’s therapists are “clinical counselors.” In essence, they are trained clinically through accredited counseling programs in the state of Indiana. TPI’s counselors have bachelor’s and master’s degrees. They are all professionally and clinically trained to use multiple evidence-based interventions, theories, and techniques in counseling. They also have training in providing counseling to clients with strong religious beliefs. Clinical counseling with a spiritual or biblical worldview can be provided should the client wish to pursue it. If a client does not want to focus on a religious area or operate from that perspective, the counselor will honor and work with the client’s preference.
4

Q: Do you prescribe medication?

No. Turning Point does not prescribe any medications. Our team consists of counselors and therapists. However, Turning Point has referrals and connections with doctors, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, and physician’s assistants that can help you determine whether or not medication is a good resource for you. We will support and walk with you as you explore this part of counseling if it is needed.
5

Q: What is the role of medication in counseling?

This is such a great question. Many conflicting beliefs about medications exist, and we respect all of them. At Turning Point, this is our philosophy on incorporating medication:
First, we believe 100% that medications prescribed the right way for the right issues can be extremely helpful. We strongly encourage our clients to work with their physicians closely and collaborate with their counselors to see the maximum benefit of counseling and medications together.
However, we also believe that medications are not the cure. They will not fix your challenges; they only help. As we continue to learn more about the human body and brain, we discover that much of what we say and do has origins within us that are often unknown. There is a lot of research supporting the effectiveness of using medications to help us balance, process, focus, and give us a boost in the right direction. Remember, most of the time, they help. What makes medications effective is when someone is working on their goals, doing their homework, and taking medication as prescribed.

At Turning Point, we are biological, psychological, social, and spiritual people. Taking medication to support our bodies when they aren’t functioning at their best can be an essential tool as a part of the greater whole. We will gladly walk you through this process.